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Afghan women call on international community to pressure the Taliban not to eliminate them from society

U.S.A.Afghan women call on international community to pressure the...

Afghan women ask international community to pressure the Taliban not to eliminate them from society

Afghan women asked through Amnesty International (AI) campaign that the international community should “pressure” the Taliban not to “wipe out” them from society and turn them into “prisoners”, A demand made before the “continuous repression” on these since the takeover of the Central Asian country.

AI launched the ’16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence’ campaign held annually in honor of women from all regions of the world fighting for their rights, and Took this opportunity to share the story of 16 leading Afghan women who have overcome “enormous obstacles” over the past twenty years To participate in the public life of the country.

These women from public sectors such as law, politics, universities and media, He spoke about his professional career, his feelings about the return of the Taliban, his hopes and fears for the future, and his recommendations to the international community. On how to continue supporting women’s rights.

In this context, the AI ​​recalled that the Taliban subjected women and girls to stringent sanctions, except for those working in health and a few other isolated matters. There is a ban on returning to one’s job and traveling in public without a ‘mahram’ (male protector).

Through the Amnesty International campaign, women from different walks of society showcased the achievements made over the past 20 years due to their re-integration into society.
Through the Amnesty International campaign, women from different walks of society showcased the achievements made over the past 20 years due to their re-integration into society.

In addition, from September 20, girls over the age of twelve are not allowed to attend school, while universities have strict gender segregation. “It highly restricts the presence of women in higher education.”

In this regard, Afghan businessman Sedika Mushtaq told Amnesty International that when he learned that the Taliban had moved to the capital, Kabul, to retake the country’s power, He felt as though he had been “thrown into the void” and “broken into pieces.”

Of the Taliban, he said, “From a bright spot, I fell into darkness without any light,” he said of the Taliban. Removal of women from government posts ‘very low’ ability of ‘effective governmentAmnesty condemned.

For Fauzia Amini, former judge of the Afghan Supreme Court, The Taliban committed “institutional discrimination against women”. “They deny our fundamental rights (…), they intend to eradicate women from society and make us prisoners in our homes,” he warned.

She shared the stories of pioneering Afghan women who have over the past twenty years gone on to participate in the country's public life.
She shared the stories of leading Afghan women who have over the past twenty years overcome “enormous obstacles” to participate in the country’s public life.

For her part, former police officer Zala Zazyk Urges the international community to “pressure” the Taliban to “guarantee women’s rights”“And do everything in your power so that” women are part of the new government.

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“The Taliban can’t eliminate half of Afghanistan‘s population,” said the former agent, who was in charge of the group until he returned. She was among the women who saw their rights improve after the fall of the first government in 2001.

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Amnesty International noted that 33 lakh girls were already receiving education and women were actively participating in the political, economic and social life of the country. “Despite the ongoing conflict, Afghan women had become lawyers, doctors, judges, teachers, engineers, athletes, activists, politicians, journalists, bureaucrats, businessmen, police officers and the military,” the organization recalled.

“These stories constitute A powerful and timely reminder of the achievements of Afghan women over the past twenty years, Despite the existence of barriers that seemed insurmountable, and at the same time provide a clear overview of the change in the lives of women and girls since the withdrawal of the Taliban,” the campaign manager said of the situation. South Asia at Amnesty International Sameera Hamidi.

Amnesty International noted that 3.3 million girls were already receiving education and women were actively participating in the country's political, economic and social life.
Amnesty International noted that 3.3 million girls were already receiving education and women were actively participating in the country’s political, economic and social life.

Similarly, she described as “incomprehensible” that while the country is reeling from an economic and humanitarian crisis, “tens of thousands more such women are being eliminated from public life.” “We urge the Taliban to respect, protect and fulfill the rights of women and girls,” to express.

Finally Hamidi appeals to the international community To work directly with Afghan women “to understand their reality and to listen to their recommendations” practice to protect your rights”.

(with information from Europa Press)

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