Saturday, August 6, 2022

Pussy Riot rocker flees Russia disguised as delivery man before tour

She said a member of the dissident punk group Pussy Riot had fled Russia disguised as a food delivery worker – a journey that was audacious “to make a statement” against the invasion of Ukraine.

Maria Alyokhina with band member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova after her arrest in 2012 for criticizing Russian President Vladimir Putin at Moscow’s main cathedral After spending nearly two years in prison, she said Wednesday she had decided she had enough of her girlfriend’s apartment in Moscow.

Alyokhina, better known as “Masha,” recalled her flight from Russia to Lithuania in an interview with CNN, saying she had been arrested six times since last summer for publicly condemning Putin, 15 days in jail each time.

“This time I’ve just decided that my tour has been scheduled, and it’s important to me to make a statement against the war as loudly as I can and speak as loudly as I can [on] What I saw in Russia,” Alykhina said. “So, I made a small change and decided not to spend these 21 days in prison, but in a rehearsal room. “

Alyokhina told CNN that she and her girlfriend Lucy Shtein donned green jackets and disguised themselves as food couriers to hide from Moscow police guarding her friend’s apartment.

Maria Alyokhina fled the country disguised as a courier.
Twitter
Maria Vladimirovna of punk band Pussy Riot in this 2017 photo.
AFP via Getty Images

“I think it was Lucy’s idea, she used it in the first place,” Alyokhina told CNN’s Anderson Cooper. “I’ll use it when it’s my turn.”

Alekina said her international passport had been confiscated by Russian authorities, and she had a friend drive her to Russia’s border with Belarus before entering Lithuania, where she stayed in places without official registration.

Alyokhina said it took her three attempts to get into Lithuania.

Maria Alekhina
Alykhina has been arrested six times since last summer for publicly condemning Putin.
KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images
Masked members of the protest band Pussy Riot leave a police station in Adler during the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics on February 18, 2014.
Pussy Riot members leave a police station in Adler during the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.
REUTERS/Shamir Zhumatov

“The first time [a] Nightmare, the second time it was okay, they just said no,” she recalls. “The first time was bad. The first time was like searching me, the car I was in, talking to the horrible KGB investigators for two hours, etc. “

Russian authorities announced in April that Alykhina’s house arrest due to recent legal woes would be changed to 21 days in exile, The New York Times reported on Tuesday. 10 years after her arrest for “hooliganism” at Pussy Riot’s Putin protest in Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior, she boldly fled.

“I’m glad I did,” Alykhina told The New York Times from an apartment in the Lithuanian capital Vilnius. “I still don’t fully understand what I did.”

Alyokhina, 33, said she hopes to return to Russia one day, but it is unclear if and when that will happen, she said.Currently, Alyokhina and 11 other members of Pussy Riot have their sights set on Berlin, where they will be Tour starts on Thursday Raising funds for Ukraine.

“If your heart is free, it doesn’t matter where you are,” Alykhina told The New York Times.

Alyokina tweet on thursday She “left Russia for tea,” leaving behind an electronic bracelet that tracked her movements in Moscow.

“Another super adventure in life,” she wrote in a post translated from Russian.

US News .

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